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June 04, 2010

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surgical error

Doctors and surgeons are bound by the Medical Practitioners Act of 2007 to demonstrate a high level of professional performance at all times. Even though we understand that doctors and surgeons work long hours and have a very stressful vocation, they are highly rewarded for their skills and have a “duty of care” towards their patients. A surgical error compensation claim falls within the category of medical negligence and not as a personal injury.

surgical error compensation

The error is made in pre-operative planning, while undergoing a surgical procedure or during post-operative care, it is most likely to be extremely serious and sometimes does not come to light until much later in life.

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NOTES

  • Blogmaster
    This blog is organized and maintained by David S. Smith, M.D., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania. His subspeciality is anesthesia for patients undergoing neurosurgery. For the past 6 years he has had responsibilites for patient safety and clinical care quality improvment in a Department of over 65 faculty who provide anesthesia care for about 24,000 patients each year. Correspondance can be sent to upennanesthesiology@gmail.com
  • Mission Statement
    The purpose of this blog is primarily to provide ongoing contact with former residents and faculty of the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A. Others may also have an interest in the topics presented. We plan to discuss a variety of issues related to the practice of anesthesiology with an emphasis on patient safety, risk management and medical legal aspects of care.
  • Disclaimer
    The content and observations on this Weblog come mostly from members of the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care of the University of Pennsylvania. However this material does not represent the official opinion of that Department, the University of Pennsylvania or any of its other Departments or Divisions. Medicine is a rapidly changing field. We cannot guarantee that any of the material here is correct or up to date.
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